For National Geographic

A wind was blowing from the west, sending dust devils spinning across northern Kenya’s plains as our guide, Sammy Lemiruni, explained how to track black rhino on foot.… Read more

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For National Geographic

Zakouma National Park in Chad is one the last remaining intact Sudano-Sahelian ecosystems in Africa. During the mid-2000s, Chad experienced civil unrest and conflict with Sudan; rampant poaching had decimated Zakouma’s elephant population, which had once roamed… Read more

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For National Geographic

More closely related to an ass than a horse, the Grevy’s zebra (Equus grevyi) is the world’s largest living wild equid.… Read more

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For National Geographic

The black rhinoceros has roamed the earth for five million years, yet it is now facing the greatest threat in its history – from poaching.… Read more

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For National Geographic

A year ago, a male lion called Cecil was killed in Hwange National Park, Zimbabwe, by an American trophy hunter. Cecil’s death caused uproar around the world and shone a much-needed light on the decline and vulnerability… Read more

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For BBC Wildlife Magazine

Local people and teams of rangers are winning the battle to save black rhino in Kenya. Joanna Eede reports on the Rhino Guardians.… Read more

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For National Geographic

Black rhino – Diceros bicornis – were once widespread throughout Africa and Asia. The disastrous combination of a thriving illegal wildlife trade and a lack of secure and suitable habitat have ensured that only 5,500 individual animals… Read more

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For Africa Geographic

There is a moving moment in the film Born Free, when Elsa the lioness walks towards Joy and George Adamson, played by actors Bill Travers and Virginia McKenna.… Read more

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For Sidetracked Magazine

The aircraft’s thermometer registered -20˚C as we circled over Lac Laporte in eastern Quebec. To the far north, miles of low snowy hills and frozen waterways stretched to the Arctic border… Read more

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For Huffington Post

Towards the end of WW1, the American Expeditionary Forces recruited Choctaw Indians to deliver messages in their native tongue. 
 
 … Read more

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For Somerset Life

Photographer Matilda Temperley talks to Joanna Eede about her recent projects and her magical childhood roaming on the Somerset Levels… Read more

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For National Geographic

Joanna Eede on the wildlife images shown at this year’s Wildscreen Festival, held last month in Bristol, which for the first time dedicated a day to the medium of still photography.… Read more

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For Travel Africa

Fifty years after the release of the film Born Free, Joanna Eede returns to Meru National Park, where it all began.… Read more

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For BBC Wildlife Magazine

Fifty years after the film of George and Joy Adamson’s lives became
a global hit, the president of the Born Free Foundation visited vital lion
conservation projects in Kenya. Joanna Eede accompanied him.… Read more

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For The Daily Beast, Great Escapes | 2014

Black rhinos are on the verge of extinction, but one safari and conservation company in Kenya is fighting to protect them and end poaching.… Read more

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For National Geographic

It is a little known fact that there are more rhinos remaining in Africa than there are lions.  In fact, until the killing of the lion ‘Cecil’ by a U.S. hunter in Zimbabwe earlier this year, it… Read more

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For National Geographic

In the shadow of Mount Kenya lie the hot lowlands of Samburu-land. This vast, beautiful region of rocky ridges, acacia grasslands and doum palm forest is the traditional homeland of the Samburu people, the rare Grevy’s zebra… Read more

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For National Geographic

 
In Dolpo, western Nepal, a yak caravan descends a snowy slope having crossed an 18,000 foot pass (Photograph by Cat Vinton, www.catvphotography.co.uk).

It is one of the last nomadic trading caravans in the world.  For more… Read more

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For BBC Wildlife Magazine

Some years ago, conservation biologist Dr. Alayne Oriol-Cotterill was tracking, on foot, a radio-collared lion through miombo woodland in Zimbabwe.  The GPS signal was weakening, suggesting the lion was moving away.  Alayne started to sprint and,… Read more

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For National Geographic

There is a moving moment in the film Born Free, when Elsa the lioness walks across an African savannah towards the couple who hand-reared her. She had spent a week trying to fend for herself in northern… Read more

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For The Times Travel

I climbed the rigging of the old Norwegian fishing boat to watch an orange moon rising over the Alboran Sea. It was midnight in Andalucia, southern Spain.
A motorboat chugged quietly into harbour and moored beside… Read more

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For National Geographic | 2011

One of the world’s last unconctated tribes lives in a remote part of the Brazilian Amazon. Their future depends on protecting their lands.… Read more

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For The Daily Beast, Great Escapes | 2014

There’s nothing like a remote trek through Morocco to help you find freedom and peace of mind…especially when the day ends with Berber whiskey and a delicious lamb tagine.Read more

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For The Daily Beast, Travel | 2014

There’s nothing like a safari to disconnect from human life and get back to nature. But get out of the 4×4 and walk instead, insists Joanna Eede.Read more

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For The Atlantic

Siberia’s indigenous reindeer-herding Nenets people are facing threats to their nomadic lifestyle from resource extraction and climate change.… Read more

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Victoria Falls

For The Daily Mail 

“Look, it’s easy,” said the guide.  “All you have to do is hang your head over the edge, and I’ll hold your feet to make sure you don’t fall.”
I was sitting in Devil’s Pool, a…

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For Journey’s Magazine

 

We rounded a corner high in the olive hills of the southern Peloponnese; below us lay the colours of the Mani.
On one side, the sea swept across the Gulf of Messinia in a block of… Read…

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For The Daily Beast, Great Escapes | 2014

The beautiful island of Santorini is imbued with the history of some of the earliest civilizations. A new hotel allows visitors to live like those settlers…nestled in the cliffside.Read more

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For The Atlantic | 2013

Karapiru escaped death when miners invaded his Brazilian forest home. But the harrowing experience wasn’t his last.Read more

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For The Atlantic

One of the largest tribes in South America, the Ashaninka’s reserve is under threat from the proposed Pakitzapango Dam.… Read more

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For The Times Travel

The throaty grunt of a lion woke me. Through the mesh windows of the tent I watched a half-moon rising over the Kapapa hills. Then the grunt again: closer. I remembered the words of the camp… Read more

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For The Observer

On a promontory outside the Church of San Nicolás, a flamenco guitarist with a long, raven-black perm plays for the tourists. His feet are squashed into tiny Cuban heels, his case open for coppers. It is glaringly… Read…

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For Geographical

“On a cold morning in October, I left Khovd, a small town in western Mongolia, and head towards the Gobi desert in an old Russian jeep.” … Read more

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For The Guardian

“Great granite statues of medieval heroes slaying the enemy from rearing horses, ancient pilgrims with wide brimmed hats in pious pose … angelic sculptures and baroque coats of arms …”… Read more

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For The Guardian

The unsung heroines of the world’s tribes.… Read more

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For Life Force Magazine

The Moken are a semi-nomadic Austronesian people, who live in the Mergui Archipelago, a group of approximately 800 islands in the Andaman Sea that is claimed both by Burma and Thailand.  ‘Everything happens at sea,” they… Read more

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For The Observer

Andalucia, in the southernmost part of Spain, is a potent place. Its spirit, its attitude, the very feel of it … whether you’re in the wild desert of Almeria, the wineries of Jerez, or caught up in… Read…

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For Guernica Magazine | 2012

On Bartholomé de las Casas and his passion for social justice.
 

 
 
 
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For Huffington Post

Concepts about the wild, and their place in the environmental movement.… Read more

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For Journey’s Magazine

It was not long after dawn; brooding lilac storm-clouds had moved beyond Kenya’s far hills, an African fish eagle screamed glided above us, and the air was filled with the sound of honking wildebeest.
To my right,…

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For Journeys Magazine

I watched as a cigarette was passed around and men studied the undergrowth. I heard the song of a scarlet-chested sunbird break the silence. And I was there when, after hours of watching nothing, the bush rustled,… Read more

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For The Guardian

“In the stretch of coastland between Fowey and St Mawes on the Roseland Peninsula, I found liberating expanses of sky and sea, deep lanes, dark night skies and all the signs of life on the move…

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For Huffington Post

Image © Western Morning News
“I spent hours poking around in ponds and peering down earthy holes as a child,” says Clare Morpurgo, wife of the acclaimed children’s author, Michael. The wonder Clare derived from nature sparked…

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Hadza Hunter in Tanzania

For The Guardian 2011

A photo-gallery that shows the attributes of tribal peoples whose skills have been shaped by their natural environment.… Read more

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For Eve Magazine

“… Sail away from the safe harbour. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore,” said Mark Twain. I could already hear the clink of the halyards …… Read more

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For The Guardian

If you take the fast train north from London’s King’s Cross to Glasgow, the first stop is the city of Peterborough. It’s a frosty morning; London is wet and hibernating … I am on my way to… Read…

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For Guernica Magazine | 2011

Why the death of tribal languages matters. There are more than 7,000 languages spoken on Earth. By 2010, more than half may have disappeared.


 
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For The Guardian Travel

Markets, restaurants, food festivals: in cities throughout the UK there’s a new counter culture that makes for a great foodie break.… Read more

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For SlowFood Magazine | 2011

Across the Arctic tundra, caribou walk towards their traditional calving grounds.… Read more

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The Independent | 2012

The story of the hunter-gatherer Awa tribe of north-east Brazil.… Read more

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For Life Force Magazine | 2013

Just south of the Equator, between the soda waters of Tanzania’s Lake Eyasi and the ramparts of the Great Rift Valley, live the Hadza, a small tribe of approximately 1,300 hunter-gatherers: one of the…

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For National Geographic

The ingenious survival skills of tribal peoples.
 … Read more

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For National Geographic

The Bolivian Kallawaya, thought to have been healers to the Inca kings, still travel through the Andes in search of traditional herbs.… Read more

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For National Geographic

Autumn in Northern Norway, and a hundred hooves power their way through the freezing waters of
Kågsundet fjord, the dark mountains of Uløya rising in the distance.  The Sámi are the indigenous reindeer herders of Scandinavia; the photographs… Read more

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For National Geographic

Words by Joanna Eede and photographs by Cat Vinton… Read more

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For National Geographic

A couple of years ago, I sat with a group of Hadza hunters on a rocky outcrop in the bushland of north-west Tanzania, and listened to them talk about their homeland.… Read more

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For National Geographic

How a tall history professor from Yale University ‘discovered’ Machu Picchu.… Read more

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