For Huffington Post

Towards the end of World War One, the German army had become adept at decoding the Allied Forces’ radio codes. To avoid the enemy ‘listening in’, the American Expeditionary Forces enlisted the help of Choctaw Indians to…

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For Huffington Post

Joanna Eede on how Mankind’s divorce from nature has impacted on the psyche of the Guarani people.… Read more

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For National Geographic

In Dolpo, western Nepal, a yak caravan descends a snowy slope having crossed an 18,000 foot pass (Photograph by Cat Vinton, www.catvphotography.co.uk).

It is one of the last nomadic trading caravans in the world.  For more than… Read more

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For National Geographic | 2011

One of the world’s last unconctated tribes lives in a remote part of the Brazilian Amazon. Their future depends on protecting their lands.… Read more

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For The Atlantic

Siberia’s indigenous reindeer-herding Nenets people are facing threats to their nomadic lifestyle from resource extraction and climate change.… Read more

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For The Atlantic | 2013

Karapiru escaped death when miners invaded his Brazilian forest home. But the harrowing experience wasn’t his last.Read more

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For The Atlantic

One of the largest tribes in South America, the Ashaninka’s reserve is under threat from the proposed Pakitzapango Dam.… Read more

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Shafts of evening sunlight illuminate the dense Amazon rainforest of northeast Brazil.
A place of extraordinary beauty and biodiversity, the Amazon is home to the puma, jaguar and anaconda. And it is also the homeland of the Awá, one of… Read more

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For Guernica Magazine | 2012

After they had tied him to the stake but before they lit the fire, Hatuey, an Indian leader, was offered a spiritual reprieve by a Spanish priest.

 
 
 
 … Read more

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For Huffington Post

Concepts about the wild, and their place in the environmental movement.… Read more

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For Guernica Magazine | 2011

Why the death of tribal languages matters. There are more than 7,000 languages spoken on Earth. By 2010, more than half may have disappeared.


 
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For SlowFood Magazine | 2011

Across the Arctic tundra, caribou walk towards their traditional calving grounds.… Read more

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The Independent | 2012

The story of the hunter-gatherer Awa tribe of north-east Brazil.… Read more

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For Huffington Post

There exist some stories so tragic, in which brutal events create so much loss, that it would seem impossible to recover from the grief, or summon the will to live another day.… Read more

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For National Geographic

From the hunting peoples of Canada to the hunter-gatherers of Africa, tribal peoples have found ingenious
ways of surviving over thousands of years.… Read more

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For National Geographic

The Bolivian Kallawaya, itinerant healers who are thought to have been the naturopathic healers for Inca
Kings, still travel through the Andean mountain valleys and highland plateaus in search of traditional herbs.… Read more

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For National Geographic

On every continent, from the green depths of the Amazon basin to the icy reaches of the Arctic tundra, children raised in tribal communities are taught the skills and values that have ensured the survival of their… Read more

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For National Geographic

Words by Joanna Eede and photographs by Cat Vinton… Read more

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For National Geographic

‘I was born in the forest, and I grew up there. I know it well, ‘ says Davi Kopenawa, a Yanomami spokesman from the Brazilian Amazon, who has devoted his life to fighting for the Yanomami’s human… Read more

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For National Geographic

The Omo River rises on the mountainous plateau of Ethiopia’s Shewan Highlands, then flows for hundreds of kilometres through lush grasslands, acacia plains and riverine forests, until it reaches Kenya’s Lake Turkana.… Read more

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For National Geographic

A couple of years ago, I sat with a group of Hadza hunters on a rocky outcrop in the bushland of north-west Tanzania, and listened to them talk about their homeland.… Read more

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For National Geographic

“You say laughter and I say larfter,” sang Louis Armstrong. The difference is subtle. Across the world, however, from the Amazon to the Arctic, tribal peoples say it in 4,000 entirely different ways.… Read more

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For National Geographic

During his recent expeditions into the remote rainforest of Acre state, contacted Indians told him that
uncontacted Indians imitate different animals to express emotions: wild pig when they are scared, macucau
bird to let people know they… Read more

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